Norwegian sets transatlantic speed record AGAIN: Dreamliner races from New York to London in just 5 hours and 9 minutes thanks to monster jet stream that pushes it to 799mph

Norwegian has broken its own record for the fastest subsonic transatlantic flight from New York to London, completing the journey in just five hours and nine minutes.

The Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner, registered as G-CJGI and captained by Gatwick-based Martin Wood, beat the record set in January by four minutes after reaching 799mph on the crossing.

The flight left JFK on Thursday February 8 and was able to touch down at Gatwick airport around an hour ahead of time thanks to a ferocious jet stream.

Norwegian has broken its own record for the fastest subsonic transatlantic flight from New York to London, completing the journey in just five hours and nine minutes. Pictured is the entire crew who operated the flight on February 8. Captain Martin Wood is on the far right
The swift flight left JFK on Thursday February 8 and was able to touch down at Gatwick airport almost an hour ahead of time thanks to a ferocious jet stream

Captain Wood said: ‘This is certainly a monumental coup for Norwegian as we’ve gone from fast growing to fastest-going. We flew at 33,000ft, right in the core of the jet stream at 193kts (222mph), which was surprisingly smooth and pushed us toward breaking the transatlantic flight record time again on our brand new Boeing 787 Dreamliner.’

In January, a Norwegian Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner was able to reach a top speed of 776mph as it hurtled across the Atlantic Ocean after being pushed on the 3,458-mile journey by an extra strong jet stream that at times reached 202mph.

This meant that its service from JFK to London Gatwick only took a total of five hours and 13 minutes, shaving 53 minutes off the expected flight duration.

This flight broke the record previously set by a British Airways aircraft in January 2015, which was able to fly from JFK to London Heathrow in five hours and 16 minutes.

The Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner aircraft (G-CKHL) used on the then record-breaking transatlantic flight adorns British tail fin hero Amy Johnson, a pioneering pilot who was the first female to fly solo from England to Australia in 1930.

Norwegian, Europe’s third largest low-cost carrier, operates double daily flights between London and New York using the state-of-the-art Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

The January 15 departure saw 284 passengers leave JFK at 11.44am local time before arriving in London at 9.57pm GMT.

At the controls was Captain Harold van Dam, who revealed a more impressive record could have been achieved, but turbulence hindered them.

Captain van Dam said at the time: ‘The 787 Dreamliner is a pleasure to fly and it’s a great feeling to know that we have set a new record in this aircraft.

‘We were actually in the air for just over five hours and if it had not been for forecasted turbulence at lower altitude, we could have flown even faster.’

Despite the speed achieved being more than the speed of sound, the flight didn’t actually go supersonic because the plane was travelling in a body of air that was already fast-moving, which increased the velocity needed to break the sound barrier.

Read full originally published story at: dailymail.co.uk